The Secret Someones and Laura Marling: Female artists you should be listening to in 2015, part 1


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The Secret Someones

I live for the beautifully rare times when I go to a show to see a group I know and adore, and end up absolutely floored by another group playing the same venue. The Secret Someones, in their wild style and their stunning girl power harmonies, are one of those hidden gems I uncovered while in San Francisco to catch Jukebox the Ghost live at Slim’s on 11th Street, during their January 30th tour show.

From the very beginning of their set I was absolutely in love with their joyful and cut-loose Weezer inspired harmonic lyricism combined with infectious Talking Heads style musicality, all wrapped up in a sense of showmanship that can only be described as pure, confident swagger. If I were to use a dated term, I would call it moxy.

The Secret Someones is a new four part alternative rock collaboration composed of indie guitarist and vocalist Bess Rogers, vocalist and bassist Leila Broussard, vocalist, guitarist and keyboardist Hannah Winkler, and drummer Zach Jones.

All of them hail from the metropolis of New York City and came together to release their four track EP I Won’t Follow in August 2014 under Cherrytree Records. They began touring in January in collaboration with long running D.C. area indie rock group Jukebox the Ghost, with whom they recorded a cover of the iconic Bangles hit “Walk Like and Egyptian”, which pays homage to the original with a cheeky guitar and retro sounding keyboard combination.


Laura Marling

After being part of the original line-up for popular British indie-folk band Noah and the Whale, Laura Marling debuted quietly but forcefully onto the British folk music scene at the tender age of 18 with her critically acclaimed album Alas, I Cannot Swim, which was nominated for the 2008 Mercury Prize.

Marlings traditional acoustic style of guitar and mandolin is paired with a breathtakingly deep lyricism that is equal parts beautiful and brutal, chronicling the inner turmoil Marling faced growing up and finding both her place as an artist in a music scene typically dominated by older men, and her place in the world as a woman.

I had the privilege of attending a Laura Marling show at the John Anson Ford theater in Los Angeles in July of the summer of 2012, following the release of her second and third albums I Speak Because I Can and A Creature I Don’t Know  and preceding the release of her fourth album Once I Was and Eagle, which gets inspiration from classic American folk. I had only ever heard of Marling through a friend, and it was this friend who has offered me a ticket to this show in exchange for my driving us to LA. After this simple show with Marling and her band framed only against the setting Southern California sun and the scent of cactus blooms.

Even though she has played to massive crowds at headliner festivals like Glastonbury and Coachella and has won several BRIT awards, Marling plays with such a quietly vulnerable air that it feels as if she is playing for herself and the people she lets into her sphere, the people she trusts with the deeply personal aspects the stories she spins with her lyrics. The progression of how she has grown and what she has overcome in the span of the years is clear in her lyrics; they are annals of her experiences that she chooses to share.

I had only ever heard of Marling through a friend, and it was this friend who has offered me a ticket to this show in exchange for my driving us to LA. After this simple show with Marling and her band framed only against the setting Southern California sun and the scent of cactus blooms, it felt as if she and her music had been my friend for years.

Her fifth album, Short Movie, debuts on the 23rd of March in the US.

 

DJ KIKI is a dj with KSSU, listen to her and stuff.

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