Angela Davis: Revolutionary


indexBlack history month is a beautiful time dedicated to celebrating the triumphs, struggles, and successes of our African American ancestors who paved the way for a world we can all live amongst each other and celebrate diversity and equality through compassion. Mainstream activists who deservingly receive much appreciation include Martin Luther King Jr, Rosa Parks, and the “controversial” Malcolm X. However, there is one extraordinary individual who also shook up America and changed history for us all.
Angela Davis, born in Birmingham AL on January 26th, 1944 is one of the greatest minds of the Civil Rights movement who often gets left out of the conversation during Black History Month. Angela Davis became involved in politics and activism at an early age when she attended Parker High school. In her junior year of high school, she was accepted into the Friends Service Committee, which helped move African American Children into integrated schools in the North.

 

However, Ms. Davis did not stop there! She was awarded a scholarship to Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts and continued her work with politics and activism. After finding her place in college, she became a student of a well respected philosopher named Herbert Marcuse, who gave her inspiration for achieving her dreams and career. In a 2007 interview, Davis stated:

 

“Herbert Marcuse taught me that it was possible to be an academic, an activist, a scholar, and a revolutionary.”

 

Davis lived up to those words through her involvement in the civil rights movement and the various books she has published. Not to mention being successfully released from jail in 1972 when she was charged with kidnapping and murder, but was found not guilty while simultaneously being the reason behind over 200 protests calling for her release. Angela’s struggle for equal rights makes her a controversial figure.

 

Angela Davis’s trial in 1972 and her involvement with the Black Panther’s Party brings along some debate about whether she is an appropriate civil rights activist to mention when discussing African American leaders. However, Ms. Davis still continues excellent work with politics, activism, and academics through her literature and involvement. Some of her most popular books include Women, Race, and Class, Women, Culture, and Politics, and Are Prisons Obsolete?

Many of Angela’s scholarly journals and articles can be found in the CSU library, which are great sources for research.

 

Davis is still heavily involved with politics and has recently appeared in a new Documentary called “13th“ where she provides her intellect and knowledge about the prison system in American society.

 

Many of the legendary civil rights activists are no longer with us, such as Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks, and Malcolm X. It is both a gift and an honor to still have such an iconic figure with us still today. Black History Month celebrates the lives, the stories, and the experiences of African American people and dives into the creation of Black culture.

 

This blog is dedicated to the life of Angela Davis and her continuous work for women, people of color, and social justice.

 

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