Tremaine Album Review


For this heavily anticipated new album Trey Songz comes back with a pretty solid album named Tremaine. Tremaine is an album Trey Songz wanted to show the listeners that he is still one of the best if not the best R&B artist in the game today. Trey Songz expressed in his interview with the Breakfast Club that he named his first track on his album named Playboy because of his current situation with women. He explained that being at the stature that he is in he feels that he can not trust a woman with his heart because, there is always more calling and does not fill the urge to be committed in one relationship.  The interview with the Breakfast Club he discussed his issues with Nicki Minaj and simply put he felt that it was weak on Nicki’s part to get at him for no reason over the allegations claimed in the Shether song. Once the interview was over the anticipation of this album has gone up. There are 15 total songs on this album. I will review the once that are highly recommended to check out and listen to on rotation.

#2 song- Come Over: This song is one of the best songs on this album that brings fans right in to show exactly why Trey Songz is one of the best in his group. A must download with great vibes, hooks, and chorus throughout the whole track.

#5 song- Playboy: A song with context and understanding where Trey Songz is coming from I feel that this song is a great song to listen to in certain moods. I enjoyed the sound the message of the song and Trey Songz delivered well on this track.

#6 song The Sheets…..Still: To me this best song on the album, with how great he switched up his flow and how smooth his voice changed talking about the experience with the woman in the song definitely makes this a favorite song on the album to me.

#10 song 1×1: This song instantly is a summer vibe song that could be a great radio song to play. Nice vibes and high upbeat rhythm to this track makes you want to vibe. Highly recommended song for those looking for a summer jam.

#12 song: What Are We Here For?: One of my favorite songs on the album that is an instant radio play. With the beat and rhythm this is a quality track that will be played a lot more in the summer.

Review Score: 7/10 Very solid album that will be played from time to time.

-DjLeodawnus

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Album Review: Kings of Leon – WALLS


kingsofleon-walls-album-2016

The year of 2016 has marked the beginning and the end of a plethora of items and people.  Over the course of the year we have lost music icons such as David Bowie and Prince to name a few; however, we have also seen new releases by formidable artists and performers such as Green Day, The Weeknd, Metallica, Radiohead, etc.  One of such releases comes from American alternative-rock band Kings of Leon with their seventh studio album titled “WALLS” (We Are Like Love Songs).  Although arguably not a masterpiece, WALLS delivers familiar Kings of Leon staples reminiscent of their material eight years prior that are both energetic and relaxing.
Alternative-rock as a genre itself can be dismissed as one that is characterized by an overuse of delay, distortion, fuzz, power chords, and underdeveloped melodies that are forgettable; however, WALLS takes these familiar elements and blends them smoothly with subtle embellishments and instrumentation to offer a bit of variety.  In the opening track, “Waste A Moment”, listeners are presented with an upbeat, almost pop-oriented single that is full of energy and announces the band’s presence with their signature overtones and gain-filled rifts.  The result is a simple, yet fun way of demonstrating that this in part is the band listeners have come to enjoy over the years, yet they have changed slightly since the last time we have heard them.  The latter effect becomes apparent at the album’s midpoint with tracks such as “Find Me” and “Muchacho”, which introduce synthesizers, rhythmic sampling, whistling, and other subtle instrumental embellishments that diversify each individual tune.
Despite these small innovations, the tracks themselves are still characteristically Kings of Leon tracks that do not stand out among the discography that they have established over the years.  “Find Me”, for example, is primarily driven by a semi-complex guitar riff that appears at the track’s beginning and makes subsequent appearances with each chorus.  This is not particularly a bad thing; however, this focus on familiarity and on what we have come to expect is exactly what makes a majority of the tracks rather predictable.  Though the synthesizer usage is present briefly in the beginning and sporadically though each verse, it is a lack of utilization of these devices that makes tunes such as “Find Me” fun but relatively forgettable.  Aside from this, active listeners will also recognize a familiarity in structure.  Yes, I refer to the typical Verse-Chorus-Verse-Chorus-Verse-Chorus.  Though there is not necessarily anything wrong with this standard format, this additional limitation does not serve the band justice in these instances.  In this listener’s opinion: “I get that it works, cool, but I am getting bored”.
The Kings of Leon have always been a band that strikes me as not too innovative in regards to new styles of music, but rather, one that seeks to improve upon a genre that is adored and enjoyed by thousands throughout the world.  They have demonstrated time and time again that they are good at what they do, and I commend them for that; however, it is time to change.  What else does the Followill gang have to offer?  Until that time, enjoy more of the Kings of Leon you have come to love.

I give WALLS, a 3 out of 5.

Album Review: Tacocat – Lost Time


TacoCatAt first glance, Tacocat seems like a very innocuous thing. The four-piece band’s name comes across as disarming and playful with sunny instrumentation to match.

Yet, to overlook the depth of Tacocat’s music, their “bubblegum rock,” is to do the band a disservice.

“Lost Time,” an album made up of 12 poignant looks at life, picks up where Tacocat last left off in every regard.

The instrumentation on “Lost Time” feels largely similar to the band’s last album, “NVM,” it’s the writing that has become blunter. Singer Emily Nokes’ skill for introspection and observation elevates Tacocat where so many other bands falter.

In a perfect world we’d receive a balanced expression of both sides of gender politics within music, but in our messy reality Nokes’ willingness to address the social issues that others dance around or weakly acknowledge is refreshing.

“Lost Time” is never pandering and never hits you over the head. In fact, it’s fun through and through. Even as the world ends on “I Love Seattle,” as the city falls into the ocean succumbing to earthquakes and tsunamis, Tacocat will joyously tell you the city feels so much like home they’d never want to leave.

Though, the importance of what Tacocat is doing comes from their social commentary.

“Men Explain Things to Me” says it all starting with its title and carrying into its lyrics (“Don’t tell me what to do / My feelings won’t subdue / Just because you told them to”). Nokes directly addresses the clichéd roles of gender through smartly employed metaphors, such as moving off of a walkway for men who take up the entire sidewalk, and voices her frustration (“We get it dude / We’ve already heard enough from you / The turning point is overdue”).

Tacocat confidently offers a female perspective on topics we typically see addressed by men. “You Can’t Fire Me, I Quit” (a reference to the Nirvana song “Scentless Apprentice,” similar to their last album’s title paying homage to Nirvana’s “Nevermind”) involves Nokes asking for a past relationship to take her back, but only so she can break up with them in return.

Nokes’ gaze then falls on “The Internet.” Here, the “Hate from the basement / Hate from the insecure,” from the anonymous and from the “mosquitos” is addressed. It’s a song with a rhetorical question, asking what right a random individual has to make a judgement over another they’ve never met.

Conversely, “Talk” looks at the disconnect between two individuals within the same room (“Together, together, alone / Stay true, true to your phone”) and the all-too-common inclination for two individuals to sit next to each other entrenched in their own phones. Nokes points out that she simply wants to use the time to talk, maybe even dance if the situation allows.

“Lost Time” culminates in the song “Leisure Bees,” a well-executed metaphor reminding the listener to “Take your time because / It’s your time to take.” Here, Nokes wisely explains that success in life is an entirely subjective term. Success doesn’t have to be based on work, it can be something as simple as your happiness.

It’s a fitting closing to “Lost Time” because Tacocat is ultimately using the album to communicate the importance of the individual. After all, “the values that you want / Are the ones that you can make.”

 

Emiliano is a DJ at KSSU

The Power Hour Recap 4/5


music

music

Good Afternoon KSSU listeners and readers! I’m DJ Ace and this my Power Hour recap for April 5th.

Basically I’ve been wanting to do this all semester, and finally had the time to sit down to hash one of these outs. These recaps are a way to go a little more in-depth about the music being played today and a chance to talk a little more about whats going on weekly. So without further ado, lets get into what music was played today!


 

  1. Fanfare – FFVII OST – As of two shows ago, this has been the new starting song every show and variations of this theme will be present every show. It especially works well as background music as I do my intro. For some history about the title, this fanfare has been used in Final Fantasy as victory music after completing a battle since the original FF released over 20 years ago. It has definitely become a staple of the franchise needless to say.
  2. Easy Lover – Phil Collins –  So our theme this show was more vocals and a little more classic sounds instead of our usual synth-wave approach. So firstly, this track also contains vocals by Phillip Bailey and the combination of both vocalists really brings the song along quite nicely. Oddly enough, the creation of the song came from a chance meeting between the two, and after a few jam sessions they decided to recorded the song in order to not forget it.
  3. Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic – The Police – Alright, so first things first, I have a huge love for The Police. Its a very influential group for me and one of the big artists I remember listening to as a kid. That being said, its hard to lock onto certain songs that really give you the listener a song that captures the groups sound, but I think this track does a great job of doing it. The Police typically create a very “ska” sound with their music, with fast tempos and strong beats. This song is no exception and I imagine by the middle of the song you are tapping your feet along with the beat.
  4. Off The Wall – Michael Jackson – Phew, another huge artist! Is my show becoming too mainstream for listeners? MJ was an artist I had the privilege of growing up to, when he was at his prime he was simply untouchable. I’m sure most agree that there will simply not be another artist who will have as big of an impact on the industry. Off The Wall is the self entitled track from one of his early albums, containing very disco like sounds. A very simple beat accompanies his already signature vocals, along with a smooth chorus. Like most of his tracks, this is very much a feel good track. As MJ states, “just enjoy yourself”.
  5. Maneater – Hall & Oates – Obviously you can’t have a 80’s playlist without some Hall & Oates. These guys wrote some of the most signature songs from the 80’s and you’ve probably heard them before and never even realized it. To keep the upbeat pace of the first half of the show, I went with Maneater. It keeps a very upbeat tempo, accompanied by a prominent bass line.

Well thats it for Part 1 of the Power Hour Recap. Tomorrow look forward to reading the second half!

– Ace

Ace is a Dj with KSSU

Weekly Staff Picks #2


Welcome back to another installation of KSSU’s Staff Picks! We have for you 5 recent songs that are resonating with everyone at the station. Now that we are all back from the almighty spring break, we have plenty of music to grace your ears. May these songs also become your new favorites. Cheers.

 

Staff Pick 1: Lucy Morales

James Supercave – Better Strange, Better Strange

The trio consisting of Joaquin Pastor, Patrick Logothetti, and  Andrés Villalobos bring to us from Echo Park, CA their debut LP “Better Strange.” Having released their debut EP “the Afternoon” in 2015, and now going on tour to support Wild Belle, the synth pop group is riding on unstoppable momentum. Their featured track Better Strange is ethereal and hypnotic with its use of harmonizing synthesizers. While sonically it’s zany, the song also celebrates the intrinsic value of eccentricity. Certainly, James Supercave has revitalized the indie electronic scene when there are overwhelming amounts of oversaturation.

 

Staff Pick 2: Anthony Parenzin

Basement – Lose Your Grip, Promise Everything

Basement’s classic grunge sound persists on half the tracks but the other half sound like they were written for a Nicholas Sparks movie. Needless to say my favorite song, “Lose Your Grip,” in all its glorified angst sounds like it could have come straight off their sophomore album Colourmeinkindness. It is also the only song on the album were we get a little screaming, so enjoy it because it is short-lived moment. Despite their newest album being hit or miss Basement is still a band that people should turn out to see. They are currently on finishing a European tour and they kick off a month long U.S. tour with Turnstile and Defeater in April. Don’t miss out! I’ll be at their Orangevale show on April 10th.

 

Staff Pick 3: Jared Torrez

Wet – Deadwater, Don’t You

Wet is a fairly new band within the Alt/Indie genre coming out of New York, and were called the most promising group by The Fader in 2015.  They just recently dropped their first official studio album called “Don’t You,” as well as finished their North American album tour in February.  Wet has been a favorite band of mine for a few years now and I have gotten the chance to see them live multiple times.  At the last concert of theirs I attended, they performed my favorite song from the album, “Deadwater” .  The lyrics are genuine and really bring out the feels as you can hear the vulnerability in the lead singer’s voice.  This is definitely a band you do not want to miss out on.

 

Staff Pick 3: Brianna Swain

Saul Williams – Think Like They Book Say, MartyrLoserKing

If you can expect one thing from Saul Williams, it’s that he will make politically and socially conscious music that you can dance to. The song starts with energetic drums reminiscent of 90’s breakbeat and slowly builds into controlled anarchy with pulsing synths, echoed bleeps and crunchy guitars. Personally, I’ve been following his work since he released “The Inevitable Rise and Liberation of NiggyTardust!” in 2007. Williams always has something relevant to say and just as he doesn’t pigeonhole himself into one mode of expression, (actor, singer-songwriter, musician, poet, writer) his music defies categorization as well.

 

Staff Pick 5: Emiliano Martin

DIIV – Under The Sun, Is The Is Are

DIIV’s most recent record, “Is the Is Are,” is a sunny shoegaze album that feel like it may have been better suited for a spring release. Though the gloomier backdrop of a winter release might make more sense given the context; this is DIIV’s first record since singer, guitarist and producer Zachary Cole Smith, left rehab for drug addiction. It’s overall a brighter album, perhaps signaling a change for the better. So, with the seasons soon changing and the last of the heavy winter rains coming to a close, the track “Under the Sun” is the perfect lighthearted song to help wish away those clouds quicker.

 

 

 

 

Album Review: Ty Segall – Emotional Mugger


TySegallAlbumAt this point in his career the only thing more wild than Ty Segall’s output, this being Segall’s 16th album in eight years, are the touring personas he has adopted for his new album, “Emotional Mugger.”

Segall keeps in character throughout all his performances, whether it be on NPR, where he adamantly refuses to break character and answer questions with utter nonsense, or The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, where Segall’s face-painted candy-tossing antics clearly leave the crowd on edge.

Of course, the seeming insanity all serves a purpose as Segall has decided to avoid all publicity. He staves off interviews and photos on this tour with the help of various masks, hoods and face paint befitting the characters of the album’s respective songs.

Perhaps tired of the media circus that accompanies any album release, Segall instead allows his live performances speak for themselves. Here, he is willingly aided by his backing band The Muggers in his various antics, the band includes guitarist King Tuff and the drummer for the band WAND, Evan Burrows, among others.

Segall’s garage-rock album “Emotional Mugger” is the perfect platform for these antics.

Produced by Segall and F. Burmudez, the album’s 11 tracks maintain the lo-fi aesthetic of Segall’s previous work with everything from Segall’s voice, saturated with delay, to the heavy distortion of each guitar.

The album opens with its strongest track, “Squealer,” which featured a strong bassline and melody combination that carrier the track into the grimy “California Hills.” This next track feels intentionally monotonous as Segall drags on about “affluent life” before a jarring tempo change that dips out as quickly as it came in.

The album’s title track “Emotional Mugger/Leopard Priestess” follows and ends up setting a good example for the album’s mixing. The instrumentation here is well spaced out allowing for heavy distortion of the guitars, panned to the left and right sides, and for the placement of the drums to move throughout the song.

The placement of the instruments essentially follows this formula throughout the album to mixed results. For example, the song “Breakfast Eggs” plays with the left and right panned guitars with the left guitar cutting in and out of harmony with the right.

The most interesting example of playing with the mixing is “Candy Sam” as the song alternates left to right between drum patterns of varying intensity.

But, even with its abrasiveness and constant energy, “Emotional Mugger” can feel a bit rote. Even with its creative mixing songs can become repetitive with some feeling like filler tracks.

“Diversion” is the best example of a low point despite all of its energy. A cover of a song of the same name by the 1960s band The Equals, it feels out of place in every way expect for its subject matter.

“Emotional Mugger” comes to a conclusion with “The Magazine,” it’s a slow song that seems to eventually just die out. At this point it becomes obvious that this album’s fixation with the baby character and the idea of candy might be a larger statement on society from Segall, namely the over-indulgence of ego.

Although not his best work, “Emotional Mugger” is Ty Segall’s most obvious statement on society, and its best songs make up for its shortcomings with the appeal of their abrasive energy.

Emiliano is a DJ with KSSU

Weekly Staff Picks #1


kssu staff pick

Welcome to KSSU’s inaugural weekly staff picks! This is where our DJs pick their current favorite song and artist from recently released music. We will feature 5-6 songs that are currently on our radar. Stay tuned every week to see what we pick, maybe your favorite track will be selected.

 

Staff Pick 1: Lucy Morales

Boss Selection – Wouldn’t it be wild, Volume 1

Boss Selection is the moniker for the seasoned world wide producer Sunny Levine. With Quincy Jones as his grandfather, he certainly is no stranger to living up to large expectations. Under Boss Selection, he has produced a mixtape inspired album with 12 different artists successfully using crowdfunding for all the costs. My personal favorite from the album is “wouldn’t it be wild” featuring Orelia. It’s an unboastful chillwave like track that becomes infectious without even being conscious about it. It’s the best kind of song to pop into your car to relax after a long day.

 

Staff Pick 2: Jerel Labson

Kanye West – Ultralight Beam, The Life of Pablo

Of course this has to be somewhere on the first KSSU’s Picks Of the Week! Hearing this first track play at the Yeezy Season 3 fashion show really set the bar and got me ready to hear the rest of TLOP. The instrumental is beautiful. The occasional drums also really get me going. Having The Dream, Kelly Price, and the choir literally taking us to church was amazing to hear. Chance the Rapper’s verse was possibly the BEST verse on the album as well. Donnie Trumpet backing the second half His flow and biblical references (“Got my ex looking back like a pillar of salt”), just DOPE. I could go on, but I have no more words. Just listen to it. One more note… Can I consider this as a Christian song??

 

Staff Pick 3: Cole Nelson

Stone Sour – Love Gun, Meanwhile in Burbank

My song of the week comes from the album Meanwhile in Burbank… by Stone Sour. Released in April of 2015, this album features hard rock covers of classic rock and metal artists. My favorite out of the album is their rendition of KISS’ classic song, “Love Gun.” Stone Sour’s version features heavy use of a grunge sounding guitar along with a strong drum line while still retaining that classic rock/disco vibe that KISS is known for. “Love Gun” is one of the better covers of a song I’ve heard recently and recommend it to those who like the original tune with a bit of a kick to it.

 

Staff Pick 4: Angelina Rios

Bomba Esteré – Soy Yo, Amacer

Bomba Esteréo is a Colombian band that formed in 2005. With the recent release of their new album Amacer, the track Soy Yo is nothing short of excellent. With a catchy beat, its traditional Colombian instruments have a contagious effect and it’s hard to resist dancing in your chair. This track represents respecting and accepting one another for who they are. While the band does not wish to conform to one genre of music, they can best be described as having an electro base with Cumbia and dance elements as well.

 

Staff Pick 5: Anne Thorp

Daughter – New Ways, Not To Disappear

Daughter is the name of a three-person, London-based indie rock group, together since 2010. Their EP ‘Not To Disappear’ came out in 2014, and this March they start an already mostly sold-out North American tour in major cities across the U.S. and Canada. New Ways is the first track of the EP, and soundly embodies all that is good about the entire album. It’s moody, the vocals ethereal, with an edge of grit in the guitars and drums that speaks of the kind of disjointed, worn cynicism modern life frequently brings. It reminds us, as singer Elena recites, that sometimes we all feel we need new ways.  

 

Staff Pick 6: Claudia Rivas

Charlie Hilton – 100 Million, Palana

Charlie Hilton, lead singer for Blouse,  released her debut solo album Palana on January 22 via Captured Tracks. The album was produced by Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s Jacob Portrait. The album includes “100 Million”, which I’ve been playing on repeat for much of this week. The track was produced by, the band Woods’, Jarvis Taveniere. The song features vocals and music by Mac DeMarco. The track sounds folk-like, similar songs by Beach House and She & Him. Hilton’s vocals are much like Zooey Deschanel in this song, light and dreamy. Lots of simple guitar chords and settle drum background occur as well. Reminds me of a tune that would play at a modern Woodstock, hippie festival. It’s a song that will keep most fans of this type of music in a good mood.

The Front Bottoms Back on Top Bottom


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I was wondering why all the hipsters in my life went crazy. I was wondering why every high school girl I dated started foaming at the mouth; why every guy with a beard and man-bun ripped off their flannel, tossing aside their kombucha, started jumping through the windows of record stores.

And I found the answer: when I listened to The Front Bottom’s new record, Back on Top.

There are a couple of reasons why I think the group’s 5th record struck a chord with so many folks around my age – born in the mid-90s.

We’re all about the age when we feel like we need to do something crazy and rebellious. I recently moved to Midtown with my ballerina girlfriend, grew a mustache, play jazz and make coffee for a living and like doing stupid stuff with my equally as stupid friends.

This is a theme that Back on Top addresses quite frequently. Going to parties, hanging out, figuring out life, dancing, rocking out, and being emotionally strung out on relationships and our new found feeling of independence – and all with the looming reality that we have to grow up at some point.

Stuff to which kids in their early 20s can relate.

Not you? Is it just me?

But the lyrics and the way these ideas are expressed aren’t trite – they wax poetic. They’re genuine and heartfelt. You can feel this guy’s struggle.

Especially the rap verse at the end of “Historic Cemetery.”

But I can’t help but note that at times the rebellious attitude feels a little bit contrived like they’re trying to market themselves to young folks.

The second reason is that they just sound like bands we liked when we were even younger than we are now with heavy influences of early indie rock.

Not the foo-foo Sufjan Stevens fluff, but Pavement, early Death Cab, Dinosaur Jr., Weezer, The Smiths, REM, Nirvana, Modest Mouse, Joy Division, and New Order.

The 90s – and definitely their sound – is popular right now. I know because that’s what I know. I was born to young artists living in Oakland in the 90s who did nothing but have the time of their lives despite their poorness.

This record makes you want to let down your hair, be rough around the edges, and shotgun a PBR.

Speaking on being rough around the edges: this albums apparent lack. The production is so clean; the players are so together, this record lack the grungy sound I feel it tries to invoke with the exception of a few voice cracks from Brian Sella. Usually, I applaud god production, musicianship, and well-executed vocals, however, it has to fit the genre. These guys have come a long way from playing garages and house parties like they used to.

That being said, there is no telling whether they made the decision to sound clean or not. Now that they’re signed, the label often makes production choices to better represent the label.

All things considered, I really enjoyed this record. It made me feel nostalgic for times I haven’t experienced, which is a tough thing to do.

Devan is a dj for KSSU

The Big Three Albums Coming Soon


Veil-of-Maya

The weather is getting more and more intense everyday just like the new music currently being produced by August Burns Red, Veil Of Maya, and Like Moths to Flames. All three bands have announced that they are going to release a new album between May and June. Also, all three have released on YouTube, under their labels’ channels, a song from their new albums. Are these guys in cahoots, or are us metal fans just blessed? Probably both, but in the end I got to buy three albums in the very near future.

First off, we have Like Moths to Flames who released a debut single on April 6th titled, “Bury Your Pain” from their upcoming project “The Dream Is Dead” which has an unspecified release date. “Bury Your Pain” has everything you would expect from LMTF; clean vocals, heavy breakdowns, assertive lyrics towards a targeted audience, and the over feeling of wanting to sing along and jump with the band. I mean, the song is still good, but it sounds like all their other stuff.. The good side to this is that you can always rely on LMTF to put out good stuff. The bad side is that it could potentially get played out or get old real quick. We will just have to wait and see what happens when “The Dream Is Dead” is released.

Up next we have August Burns Red, who published the song “The Wake” on April 13th from their upcoming album “Found In Far Away Places” which will be released on June 30th. As you may or may not know, ABR’s last album “Rescue & Restore” was pretty light-hearted and had some Christian Worship influences in it. “The Wake” is heavy, dark, and similar to the way that ABR sounded before their last album. With references to disasters inside of the bible and impending things to come, “The Wake” is like a rhino; strong and flattening out the competition. I am so ready for this next album to come out already that I have listening to “The Wake” everywhere I go with my shoulders and chest puffed up. It makes me look a constipated bear, which is pretty brutal.

Last but most certainly not least, Veil of Maya has released three songs: “Phoenix” (January 1st), “Mikasa” (March 23rd), and “Teleute” (April 13th) all from the upcoming album “Matriarch” which will release on May 12th. VoM is famous for their technical skills along with deep, guttural vocals. The band currently released a Breaking Bad parody video called, “Breaking Bands” which explains that the vocalist is starting to do cleans and multiple ranges of vocals while the guitarist is switching up his style. So far, all their songs released are amazing. The vocals are on point while the guitar playing and drumming reminds me of a mixture between old VoM and Born Of Osiris. Veil of Maya took a risk, and I 100% believe that it paid off.

To hear some of these bands and other craziness, tune into my show “Shred the Gnar” Tuesday mornings at 8 only on http://www.kssu.com.

Below are the links to some of the new songs mentioned in this blog.

The Zombie 5 Tour Review


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Last Sunday, I went and saw (in order) Secrets, Born of Osiris, Word Alive, and the Devil Wears Prada at the Ace of Spades in Sacramento. The name of the tour was the “Zombie Five Tour” because it has been five years since the Devil Wears Prada released their “Zombie Ep”- one of their greatest achievements. There was laughing, crying tears of joy, and a lot of sweat in a human sardine can. Here’s how my night went.

Started off with the usual tradition- Dutch Bros. drive thru coffee in Davis. Got myself a strawberry and lime iced Rebel, which is their trademark energy drink, so I was ready for the long night ahead. Accompanying me was my girlfriend while the rest of my crew was saving us a spot at the front of the line. Walking to our spot in line, I could feel the teenage angst staring me down while everyone is decked out in gear ranging from Goth streetwear to gym clothes with band logos. I myself went in some nice khakis and a windbreaker. After hanging out in line and farting on some teens behind me, we quickly hurried inside the venue when the doors opened.

Usually, Ace of Spades has a band open up for the other bands, but Secrets was the first band to go on. The last time I saw Secrets was also at the Ace of Spades, but when they had their old vocalist. For being the first band, Secrets did great. They played some classics, some new stuff, and even a song that has yet to be released. Aside from some ear-piercing highs from the singing, they did a good job.

Born of Osiris

Born of Osiris came next and they straight up murdered the stage. Stage presence out the ying-yang, sound effects on point, and the heavy/technical guitar skills from Lee McKinney reminded me why Born of Osiris is one of my favorite bands. Born of Osiris was like a shot of espresso after the creamer, started off sweet and escalated to a level of strength that even Goku would be impressed by. Well done BOO, well done once again.

The last time I saw The Word Alive was at Warped Tour, and they were all hyped about their newest release, the “Real.” Album. Some of those songs are pretty light, so I thought, “Aw man, I’m gonna see the same performance twice.” I was proven wrong. The Word Alive played a lot of heavy songs, including oldies like “2012” and “House of Anubis”. Before the breakdown to 2012, Telle Smith (the frontman) split the whole entire front half of the crowd like the Red Sea and told them that when he counts the breakdown in, that everyone run at each other as fast as possible. This is what we call a “Wall of Death” and the last Wall I partook in ended up with my shirt getting ripped in half, fighting some fat guys, and almost passing out in the crowd. Fun fact: that was also during a Word Alive set in that very same venue.devil wears prada

Last but certainly not least, the men of the hour, The Devil Wears Prada. I thought that TDWP would only play their EP and a couple more songs. Then I found out from an outside source that their set list was 16 songs. 16 SONGS. The first five were some classics, then the next five were the Zombie EP all in order, all with the sound effects in between the songs as well. After the EP, I did not stay for the whole set list, but I was okay with that. Also, the stage had crazy light displays, including a giant symbol from their album 8:18. The Devil Wears Prada was the very first band that got me into Metal, and to see them live almost eight years after I heard their first album made the night all worth it. They were the best band up on that stage, and I cannot wait to hear what they have next.

Speaking of that, I heard a rumor (which has yet to be confirmed) that The Devil Wears Prada is back on Rise Records and is going to release a Space Ep.

We will just have to wait and see.

Thanks for reading my lengthy memory written onto this blog! If you want to hear more music from these bands and bands alike, or if you know of a band you want on my show, listen in on Tuesday mornings at 8 o’clock on www.kssu.com or contact me via Instagram @gingerbeardthefoot

Much love,

DJGingerbeard